Some Nuggets on How To Be Rich

Everyone no matter their age, they all want to know how to be rich, how to hack life and make it financially. The significant driving force has been the perception that wealth or money means everything or can buy you all and make you happy. Millions of books have been written since the ancient times and yet you will find yourself looking for more and hopefully direct and easy ways around how to just make it. Well, you did great reading this article since you will see that most of what you need to make it you already have it.

Most young people just want to hack life and make it all at once without that effort nor patience of learning. This has created severe habits such gambling and fraud as a means to get rich quick. The other vice that has risen due to the elusive fact that all can make it is a generation of desperate and drug-addicted youths who believe that their fate is already sealed. This article is a wakeup call and a call to action to drop page thumping and expecting to find that one magical trick. You are all that you need.

How to start.

To begin with, by reading this means that you are ready and willing to make something out of yourself, get your head straight now and acknowledge that you have a working brain and a desire to make it.

The second move is to dream and make sure that you do not just imagine. The moment you can visualize anything in your head means that you can be able to make it happen for real.

Go ahead and write down your plan and evaluate how you are planning to achieve that. This, therefore, has to begin with small ideas and seeing them through. You cannot start planning for a Ferrari, and you do not own an account even. Start small and be patient to look at the fruits of your hard work.

Patience as a value comes in hand even when managing your wealth later in life. You have to carry out planned and well-calculated risk and wait patiently and trust in yourself that it will work.

The other thing is growing some balls because the moment you start investing you will have to be ready for risks and failures. Do not dwell on the failures instead move on and have better plans, do not lose focus but keep the desires, and all will work eventually.

Lastly, when you start making something, reinvest and work to grow bigger. Instead of celebrating and blowing up everything take it back and let it grow. Always have the mentality of safeguarding the capital you input at any time and then re-invest the profits for growth.

Conclusion.

The smart ones only win the money game and wealth creation. By accessing such information, you have been made smart, and that means you can go forth and grow yourself to whatever level you want.

How to Get on in a Man’s World: 3 Women That Tamed the Old West

How does a woman succeed in a man’s world? In the American West of the Nineteenth Century, most accepted what society offered. Find your man, get married, have babies – then commit to a life of washing, cooking and sewing; hard, unrelenting and invariably thankless.

But a few women were having none of this. Anything a man could do, they argued, so could a woman. And they proved it. A few, notably Annie Oakley, made their point with a gun. Others chose the gaming table. Cards were a great leveller of the sexes and three women in particular showed just how.

Alice Ivers (1851-1930)

When you marry an American mining engineer, Alice accepted, the mining camps of states such as Colorado and Texas become your home. You might be the only woman in a rough, tough male world relieved only by drink and gambling. The girl originally from Devon, in England, played society’s ‘game’, to a point. She sewed and cooked for husband Frank.

But if he can have fun gambling, Alice reasoned, why can’t I? So she followed Frank into the gambling hall and discovered she was good at cards – very good. Particularly Poker. Just how good, gambling houses like The Gold Dust in Deadwood, Colorado, quickly discovered. Here was a woman, they realised, who was a ‘natural’ poker player. One with a good head for numbers that could quickly weigh up the odds. Someone who could keep a straight, ‘poker’ face. She became known as ‘Poker Alice’ with good reason.

Alice was quite capable of earning $6000 in a night, and breaking the bank. Better, the owners realised, to have this petite, 5’4″ beauty with shining brown hair working for you as a dealer. Men were drawn to her table like flies to a spider’s web. Mesmerised by her appearance, distracted by the cigars she loved to smoke, many were humbled by her skill at cards.

“I would rather play poker,” Alice once quipped, “with five or six ‘experts,’ than eat.” Except on a Sunday. A strict, moral upbringing and strong religious convictions guided her to the end – even when in later years she ‘diversified’ into prostitution.

And no one crossed her. All knew she had a.38 pistol in the voluminous folds of her fashionable dresses, bought on regular shopping trips to New York. And she wasn’t afraid to use it.

Eleanor Dumont (1834 – 1879)

Few consciously picked a fight with Eleanor. Certainly not the drunken miner who nicknamed her ‘Madame Moustache’, alluding to the tuft of hair on her upper lip. A rare female in the mining camps of the California Gold Rush, everyone knew she kept a Derringer pistol under her skirts. To accost this lady and demand her purse, as two gentlemen discovered one evening, was to invite a blast of lead. Neither individual, it is recorded, waited for her to reload.

Like Alice, Eleanor was a consummate card player who outplayed the men. One of the first professional Blackjack players, her skill as a dealer and counter of cards was legendary. Few men bettered her. Plenty tried as they flocked to the tables of Dumont’s Palace, the card den she ran with another professional gambler, David Tobin.

Everyone knew the rules of entry: dress smartly, behave properly and no women allowed. The all-male clientele were entranced by their elegant, bejewelled hostess, who calmed them with her quiet dignity and deflected trouble with her sharp wit. Most soon became accustomed to the lady who rolled her own cigarettes and drank champagne.

As time stole her looks, it became harder to charm and disarm; prostitution was added to the career portfolio. The serene, elegant hostess metamorphosed into the saloon character, trading ribald jokes over a glass of whiskey.

But Eleanor never lost her passion for cards, or her principles. Despite jealous rivals defaming her as a card sharp, she maintained to the end her reputation as an honest dealer who never defaulted on a debt. When luck finally ran out at the gaming table, and money loaned to her by a friend could not be repaid, Eleanor quietly exited from the room and from life, aided by a glass of wine laced with morphine. A note found by her body stated simply that she had ”tired of life”.

Lottie Deno (1844-1934)

What was a Southern belle, from a prosperous Kentucky family, doing in Fort Griffin, Texas in the 1870s? This outpost, near the Texas panhandle, was one of the wildest frontier towns of its day – home to notoriety on both sides of the law, from Sheriff Pat Garrett to Billy The Kid – a place, so people said, that “had a man for breakfast every morning”.

Yet this striking redhead, with a personality that sparkled as brightly as her brown eyes, revelled in its notoriety and capitalised on its booming economy. This was a town flush with cash from high bison prices, and much of it was spent at The Beehive gambling saloon. As well as good looks, Lottie was a gifted card player, who thrived on parting men from their money – including gunslinger and noted card player, Doc Holliday, whom Lottie relieved of a cool $3000 one evening.

Her strict Episcopalian family would have been horrified. But the woman born Carlotta J.Thompkins made sure they never found out, hiding behind a series of pseudonyms of which Lottie Deno was the most famous. An abbreviation of Dinero, the Spanish for money, it was earned after she beat all-comers at a hand of poker. A drunken voice from a far corner of the bar cried out, “Honey, with winnings like them, you oughta call yourself Lotta Dinero”.

Her father, a successful racehorse breeder who died fighting for the Confederacy, might have winced at her surroundings. But he would have been quietly pleased. His daughter ‘flipped the pasteboards’ with a skill and passion to match his own. All those hours spent teaching the young Lottie about cards, on the paddle steamers and in the finest gambling rooms of New Orleans, had paid off.

And she conducted herself like the Southern Lady she had been raised, exuding class to the end. A lady with impeccable manners, who expected the same of others – no-one ever dared drink, swear or smoke at her table. A woman to trust, whose word was her bond.

And she was smart. It’s rare for a gambler’s luck to last for ever but Lottie Deno was that rarity. She bowed out with her earnings intact, and grew old in comfortable retirement, with her one and only husband Frank.

As good as any man

Three women, each very different from the others, all with a gift – a natural ability to play cards. Not enough by itself to survive in a man’s world, but all three turned this skill to their advantage. They proved they were as good as any man through strength of character, innate intelligence and sheer determination.

The Addictive Personality Part Two

Much has been written about genetic predisposition and its relationship to addictive personalities. Having an addict in the family does not guarantee that everyone in the family will become addicts. But many believe that hereditary factors can raise a person’s level of vulnerability to substance abuse or other addictions. That may explain why some gamble in moderation and others compulsively-why some can drink for enjoyment and others become alcoholics.

It does seem as if those with the genetic predisposition will engage in some type of excessive behavior but will not necessary choose the same stimuli they have been exposed to. Adult children of alcoholics may never drink but they may become addicted to gambling. Children of drug addicts may exercise excessively or be workaholics.

There is no single gene that determines a person’s susceptibility to addiction. Studies comparing identical and fraternal twins estimate that genetic factors account for 40 to 60 percent of the occurrence of the gene variation.

Researchers have discovered a number of genes that link to addiction through DNA testing. One gene causes dizziness and nausea from smoking and is more present in non-smokers than smokers. Alcoholism is rare in those who have two copies of the ALDH2 gene. Other genes have been linked to narcotic dependency.

Variants in certain genes have been shown to suppress dopamine signals in the brain. Those with these blunted receptors have the need to seek higher levels of stimulation to reach the same level of pleasure as those who don’t have the variants. DNA testing can offer vital clues in battling addiction but the use of it is very controversial. The concern is that some may use this information for discrimination purposes.

It comes down to the nature versus nurture argument. Environment and upbringing are believed to be equally important in shaping the personality. Our life circumstances and emotional experiences may have more influence than our genetic make-up does. Under this theory no matter our chemical make-up, we still have the ability to choose and control our actions.

There are factors that may indicate a higher risk of developing a serious addiction. People who have difficulty thinking about the long term consequences of their actions are more susceptible to developing an addiction. So are those who do everything in excess and/or to extremes, and those who habitually substitute one compulsion for another. For example, stressed out workaholics may come home at the end of the day and start drinking to help them relax. They may use cybersex because they don’t have time for real relationships. They may stress-eat.

Those with addictive personalities are most vulnerable during periods of heightened stress such as adolescence and times of transition. People who suffer from mental illnesses, emotional disorders, and personality disorders are highly prone to addiction as well. Without being aware that they have a condition, they may self-medicate to manage emotions using substances or behaviors to relieve whatever discomfort they may feel.

Nonconformists, non-achievers, and those with deviant personalities are also prime candidates for addiction. Many adult addicts report having been subjected to deprivation or overindulgence in their childhoods. Others report that they were negatively impacted by their parents’ constant, unpredictable fluctuation between over-praise and over-criticism.

Addictions are unmanageable, excessive, and repetitive. The addiction activity begins harmlessly with a pleasurable experience, but over time more and more of the activity is needed to achieve the same effect. People become dependent on the high they get and find it difficult to stop the behavior. If deprived of their fix they will find a substitute. If forced to stop the behavior they will suffer physical or psychological symptoms of withdrawal that compel them to resume the addiction. Over time they lose the ability to cope with life without the addictive stimuli.

People with addictions will deny that what they’re doing is detrimentally affecting them while work, family, and social relationships suffer and their health declines. Their desperation often lead them to take extremes in getting the fix, which ultimately creates financial and legal issues.

Addictions can be classified as hard or soft. Hard addictions, also known as substance addiction, are categorized by the rapid affect they have on many aspects of the person’s behavior as well as the effect they have on everyone around him or her. Abuse of alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics are usually the source of this type of addiction. This is different than substance abusers who use from time to time. Substance addicts spend every waking moment finding ways to buy and use drugs or alcohol.

With soft addictions the abuser uses activities that are harmless to most people. The consequences of those behaviors are not immediately felt. Cigarette smoking and coffee drinking are two commonly known examples of soft addictions. It is much easier to hide soft addictions and cover up the behaviors that result from them. But soft-addictions have the propensity to lead to more serious addictions down the road.

Gambling is another common example of a soft addiction. Gamblers with addictive personalities go through three stages. In the first phase, also known as the winning phase, the person has control over his or her behavior. The second stage is known as the losing phase. In this phase the person begins gambling alone, gambling large sums of money, and borrowing cash to pay off mounting debt. The third phase is called the desperation phase. In this phase the gambler engages in more risky, sometimes illegal behavior. In desperation he or she may borrow money from non conventional sources. Depression and attempted suicide are common in the third phase of gambling.

Other examples of soft addictions are eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and compulsive over-eating. Though there are other factors that contribute to this type of behavior, it can develop into pathological behavior that is very similar to addiction. The anorexic fixates on the goal of losing weight. Once the person begins dieting he or she finds it very hard to stop. Those with bulimia are after the same goal as those who are anorexic, but the mode of operation is different. Instead of limiting their diet they binge on large amounts of food and then purge it before their bodies have the chance to digest it. Compulsive eaters are not concerned with weight loss or weight gain, though the disorder often results in obesity. They have a compulsive urge to eat, whether hungry or not.

Something as beneficial as exercising can become a preoccupation or addiction to those who are predisposed to having one. Running is the most prevalent; runners are known to get a runner’s high and can become dependent on it. This is attributed to mood-enhancing chemicals called endorphins that are released during exercise. An addiction occurs when the exercise activity is used as an escape or a coping mechanism. It’s a problem when it becomes so excessive that the body suffers injury, and when it negatively impacts relationships.

Compulsive buying falls under the category of soft addictions. Those who do it are addicted to the buzz it gives them. It has nothing to do with what they are buying, it is simply their drug. They buy only for the sake of buying without ever intending to use it. Those with this disorder often suffer from other disorders such as depression, mood swings, and anxiety. Buying gives them temporary relief, but after they do it they feel heightened anxiety and intense guilt. One study showed that twenty percent of compulsive buyers suffer from an eating disorder as well.

The two newest additions to the soft-addiction category are Internet abuse and cell phone abuse. They are more prevalent in younger generations, though there is a significant number of older people who develop these addictions as well.

Those who have an Internet addiction, also known as pathological Internet use, find they cannot control their usage of it. They may be drawn to online games, social networking sites, or other online sites, and will spend an excessive amount of time there. The use becomes an addiction when withdrawal symptoms such as mood changes are suffered when they are away from it.

Some people become addicted to cyber relationships. A problem occurs when these relationships are used to avoid face to face, interpersonal interactions. This addiction can lead to social, psychological, and work or school problems.

A recent study shows that those who are addicted to cell phone use display behaviors very similar to those with addictive personalities-low self-esteem, approval seeking, insecurity. Cell phones have become indispensable in our lives, but they can reinforce the tendency of over-attachment for those with addictive personalities.

http://randigfine.com/addictive-personalities/

Understand That Wealth is a Consequence, Not a Reward

If you work hard at making money, you stand a better chance of becoming rich. You have to accept that money is a payment given to you for clever thinking and hard work. The harder and smarter you work, the more you will earn. You don’t get given the money by a committee who examine whether you deserve it or not, whether you have been good enough or not. It is a direct consequence.

We often look at someone who has money and make all sorts of value judgements about whether they deserve it or not. We all do it. It was reading about Calvin Ayre – the internet bookie – who has grown very rich indeed running online gambling. He has something like 16 million customers in the US. The US Department of Justice isn’t very happy about this and wants to shut him down.

He has grown rich exploiting an alleged US law loophole whereby what he does is alleged to be illegal but he isn’t in the country to commit any crime. Do we judge him? I don’t. I study this information to see if I could make use of it. What might be wrong is the gambling. But I am aware that his consequence of hard work has been lots of money.

I was watching a TV programme the other day about a chap who cleans and polishes cars for rich celebs and such like. He charges $3,000 for car washing. Mind you, this does include polishing. Now is his money a reward or a consequence? I don’t think he would see it as a reward. It’s the price he sets, and customers pay him because he is the best car cleaner in the world. The consequence of his business idea, skill and effort is to be very well paid.